Miller Jordan Middle School > Students > UIL Academic Events

UIL Academic Events

UIL Academic Competition Prepares Students for the Future

  1. Preparation for College – Competition develops higher-level thinking, organization of thoughts and information, and effective communication with others.
  2. Training for Careers – Numerous studies indicate that students who have been involved in extracurricular events have higher job success.
  3. Life Skills – Participation in extracurricular events builds a strong foundation for life-long learning and the development of social skills.
  4. Confidence – Involvement in academic contests builds poise and assurance, as well as the ability to handle stressful conditions.
  5. Fun – Competition allows students to interact with others, establish lasting friendships and enjoy the thrill of learning.

 

UIL Program Coordinator:

Debra Castillo, Librarian | dcastillo@sbcisd.net

Middle School Academic Events:

Calculator | Dictionary Skills | Duet Acting | Impromptu Speaking | Listening Skills | Maps, Charts, & Graphs | Mathematics | Modern Oratory | Number Sense | Poetry | Prose | Ready Writing | Science | Social Studies | Solo Acting | Spanish Poetry | Spelling

***Availability of Event access depends on number of students signed up and placement of an Academic event sponsor

SCIENCE & MATH EVENTS
Calculator Students will use mathematics and calculators to solve a series of math problems. Topics include addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division, roots, and powers, as well as topics found in recent mathematics textbooks.
Number Sense Students will use mathematics to solve a series of problems using only mental math. Students will not be able to make any marks on paper except to answer. Topics include arithmetic, geometry, algebra, and number theory, as appropriate for grade level.
Mathematics Students will use mathematics to solve a series of problems using only their brain, pencil, and paper. Topics include arithmetic, integers, fractions, decimals, exponents, order of operations, probability, statistics, number theory, interest, measurements, and conversions.
Science Students will solve a series of problems relating to scientific facts, the understanding of scientific principles, and the ability to think through scientific problems. Contestants will need to both have a good knowledge of science the ability to think critically about a variety of scientific concepts and processes.
OTHER WRITTEN EVENTS
Dictionary Skills Thorough knowledge of the dictionary is a way to increase a student’s ability to find the information that is needed for classwork as well as everyday living. Each Dictionary Skills test consists of 40 objective and short answer questions to be completed in 20 minutes.
Listening Skills Contestants will listen to a script ranging from seven to ten minutes in length, take notes as needed, and use their notes to answer 25 multiple choice, true/false and short answer test questions. A variety of subject matter will be used for the listening tests.
Maps, Charts, & Graphs The maps, graphs & charts contest is designed to help students learn to get information from a variety of maps, graphs and charts including world maps, pie charts, bar charts and local area maps. The objective test will measure skills such as using a reference book to locate information, making comparisons, estimating and approximating, using scale and interpreting grid systems, legends and keys. Students will be given an objective test containing approximately 75 multiple choice, true/false, and fill-in-the-blank questions which must be answered in 45 minutes.
Ready Writing Contestants are given a choice between two prompts, which define the audience, and provide the purpose for writing. Students should be encouraged to analyze the prompts for the purpose of writing, the format, the audience and the point of view. The format may be, for example, a letter, an article for the newspaper or an essay for the principal. Various writing strategies may be stated or implied in the prompt.
Social Studies The Social Studies contest is designed to test student knowledge of topics defined by a study outline, which is updated yearly.  Questions on the exam are based on state defined objectives and questions are taken from state adopted textbooks and identified primary sources.
Spelling

 

The spelling contest is designed to give students exposure to a wide variety of vocabulary words. It is not a contest of memorization. For the most educational value, preparation for this contest should include instruction in the rules of the English language, meanings and definitions, and root words. In addition to learning to spell proficiently, contestants will learn to write clearly and to capitalize words properly.
SPEAKING EVENTS
Impromptu Speaking Contestants will draw three topics and have three minutes to prepare a speech, which must be presented without any notes. The contest gives participants experience in thinking, organizing, formulating clear thoughts, and delivering those thoughts to an audience effectively.
Modern Oratory Contestants will select one of the topics, determine the critical issues in the topic, and acknowledge both pro and con points citing support discovered in their research. Students will choose a side they will defend and support that side with additional evidence. Along with the skills of analysis, research, note-taking, documentation, evaluation and decision-making come those of delivery and the skill of memorization.
Poetry Interpretation The poetry reading competition should be an extension of the classroom literary and language arts activities in poetry. Each may be a single reading, a cutting from a longer selection, or a combination of several selections. The same selection may be read in all rounds, but different selections are permissible. Selections must be published although the author may be unknown or anonymous. The maximum time for each presentation is six minutes.
Prose Interpretation The prose reading competition should be an extension of the classroom literary and language arts activities in short stories and children’s fiction. Each may be a single reading, a cutting from a longer selection, or a combination of several selections. The same selection may be read in all rounds, but different selections are permissible. Selections must be published although the author may be unknown or anonymous. Prose readings may include sketches, fables, tales, science fiction, fantasy, mysteries and the like. The maximum time for each presentation is six minutes.
Spanish Poetry Reading literature out loud provides opportunities for students to analyze the text, to grow and to develop as a performer, to communicate a message to an audience and to perform an artistic creation. Poetry is used in this contest. (Language of presentation would be Spanish.)
ACTING EVENTS
Solo Acting This is an individual event.  A Contestant selects a monologue to memorize and present for competition.  Emphasis for evaluation is placed on understanding of the monologue,  presentation of character and entertainment value.
Duet Acting Two contestants select a scene to memorize and present for competition.  Selections may be cuttings taken from dramatic literature or adapted from other literary forms.  They may also be taken from scripts specifically written for duet competition.  Emphasis for evaluation is placed on understanding of the duet, characterization and the interaction of the ensemble.